I= STUDY ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF INDIGENOUS FODDERS AS INFLUENCED BY DIFFERENT STAGES OF GROWTH
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Title of Thesis
STUDY ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF INDIGENOUS FODDERS AS INFLUENCED BY DIFFERENT STAGES OF GROWTH

Author(s)
Yahya Ashraf
Institute/University/Department Details
Institute of Chemistry University of the Punjab, Lahore
Session
1996
Subject
Chemistry
Number of Pages
185
Keywords (Extracted from title, table of contents and abstract of thesis)
FODDER, Berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum), lucerne (Medicago sativa), oats (Avena sativa), sorghum (Sorghum vulgare), bajra (Pennisetum ryphoidium), mazenta (Maize x Teopak), sadabahar (Sorghum x Sudan grass), cowpeas (Vigna sinensis), animal nutrition

Abstract
Chemical composition of locally cultivated fodders was determined to see the effect of varieties and harvesting intervals. Berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum), lucerne (Medicago sativa), oats (Avena sativa), sorghum (Sorghum vulgare), bajra (Pennisetum ryphoidium), mazenta (Maize x Teopak), sadabahar (Sorghum x Sudan grass) and cowpeas (Vigna sinensis) were analyzed for proximate composition, cell wall constituents, macro and micro minerals and carotene contents. In berseem fodder initial cuttings were more creditable with regard to crude protein and carotene contents, while these were low in fibre contents. The second and third cuttings. could be preferred but the varieties did not exhibit any remarkable variability. Variations in minerals were inconsistent. In lucerne fodder the variations due to varieties as well as cuttings with regard to chemical composition were not marked. Initial three cuttings of oats, fodder had better nutritive merits than fourth one which had comparatively less nutrients. Minerals were equally at moderate level but sodium and copper were much less. Carotene was also lesser at 4th growth stage. No prominent variations were found among varieties regarding nutritive values. In sorghum fodder various nutritive components among different varieties were not of high magnitude. Sodium, phosphorus, copper and zinc were much lower in all varieties and at all growth stages. Multicut bajra did not show marked variations in nutritive components due to cuttings. The varietal differences were also not so wide. All four cuttings of different varieties may be equally accepted for animals feeding. Marginal zinc .contents were observed at 3rd and 4th cuts of this fodder. The effect of growth stages on mazenta fodder was not marked, but for sodium and zinc contents, this fodder may fulfil the animal needs. Fourth growth stage had lower CP, the initial three growth stages could therefore be preferred. The growth stages were not much variable with regard to nutrients composition in sadabahar fodder. All the four stages of cutting could be equally preferred for feeding provided these are equally palatable. Cowpeas fodder did not show wide compositional variation among different growth stages. The nutritive value remained fairly constant during all the stages of cutting.

It may be concluded that there was no prominant discrimination for varietal selection in any fodder. Remarkable differences however, were found with variable trends for different nutritive components. Further the first three cuttings/growth stages of all fodders seemed to be more nutritive. The fourth stage/cut may also be acceptable provided it is palatable.

Download Full Thesis
2541.77 KB
S. No. Chapter Title of the Chapters Page Size (KB)
1 0 Contents
116.57 KB
2 1 Introduction 2
91.34 KB
  1.1 Fodders In Relation To Animal Nutrition 2
  1.2 Fodder Situation In Pakistan 4
  1.3 Need Of The Project 7
  1.4 Objectives 9
3 2 Review Of Literature 10
387.53 KB
  2.1 Proximate And Cell Wall Composition 10
  2.2 (A) Mineral Contents 27
  2.2 (B) Carotene Contents 34
4 3 Materials And Methods 36
142.23 KB
  3.1 Sampling 36
  3.2 Chemical Analysis 37
  3.3 Statistical Methods 46
5 4 Results And Discussion 49
1223.41 KB
  4.1 Berseem 49
  4.2 Lucerne 49
  4.3 Oats 75
  4.4 Sorghum 87
  4.5 Bajra 100
  4.6 Mazenta 109
  4.7 Sadabahar 115
  4.8 Cowpeas 122
6 5 Summary 130
556.12 KB
  5.1 Recommendations And Suggestions 134
  5.2 Benefits Of Study 134
  5.3 Bibliography 135
  5.4 Appendices 150